Finland Reclassifies Sex Abuse Laws Amid Migrant Grooming Gang Scandal

The recent spate of sexual attacks on underage schoolgirls as young as ten has spurred the Finnish authorities into action.

A cross-party decision for legislative changes (to be made before elections due in April) has been reached in an attempt to stomp out grooming and sexual abuse.

Finland's Justice Ministry is set to change rape laws to ensure that sex without consent is always a crime, in line with previous demands from a citizens' initiative, reports national broadcaster Yle.

The changes, largely influenced by neighboring Sweden, are expected to tighten legislation concerning sex with minors and give more consideration to victims in helpless situations. In the future, sex with a child will always be considered rape, which is not the case nowadays.

Former editor-in-chief of Breitbart News London has warned for years about the Islamic invasion into Europe and has now been proven right.

At present, intercourse with someone below the age of consent is classified as aggravated child abuse. This led to massive outrage when Finnish prosecutors last year failed to charge a man convicted of sexually abusing a 10-year-old with rape.

Previously, a citizens' initiative on consent law gained 57,000 signatures, but was initially met with a cool reception from Justice Minister Antti Häkkänen and was given the cold shoulder by parliament.

However, following last week's series of arrests over child sex abuse featuring migrant suspects, Häkkänen changed his tune, which campaigners see as their victory. By his own admission, Häkkänen was shocked by the recent reports of rape and sexual abuse. Nevertheless, he stressed that the changes should be made after more careful consideration.

A picture taken on January 14, 2019 in Helsinki shows a man reading HS Metro newspaper, with on the cover a story about alleged sex crimes against minors in Helsinki and Oulu. - Finnish lawmakers will urgently discuss tougher measures against foreign-born criminals this week, after recent outrage at a string migrant men arrested over alleged sexual abuse of underage girls (MARTTI KAINULAINEN/AFP/Getty Images)

A similar consent law has been implemented in several countries, including Germany and Sweden. In Sweden, it has led to more convictions of rape, with more severe punishments handed out, according to Swedish Radio.

Additionally, the changes will affect police rules on data gathering to allow them to better track individuals suspected of grooming online. Furthermore, the government is to look at whether aggravated sex crimes constitute sufficient reason to rescind Finnish citizenship.

However, another, more radical petition demanding the deportation of foreign sex offenders is still gathering signatures in light of the recent grooming gang scandal. At the time of writing, it has amassed close to 104,000 signatures, almost double as the consent petition.

This initiative is backed by the right-wing Blue Reform party, who want the Finnish government to interpret international agreement more freely than before. The party's requirement is to be able to deport refugees convicted of sexual offenses, regardless of whether their home country is considered safe or not.

This would require a constitutional change, an unlikely measure. Still, a number of Finnish politicians, including Interior Minister Kai Mykkänen, call for harsher penalties for foreigners convicted of sex crimes.

Meanwhile, the number of reports of sexual offenses against children increased markedly last year, reaching 1,400 and topping 2017's figure by 18 percent, Yle reported.

About a quarter of all reported sexual offenses were carried out by people with a foreign background, police inspector Pekka Heikkinen informed, which signals clear over-representation.

You can read this article as it originally appears at Sputnik here.

Dan Lyman joins Alex Jones via Skype to give a small taste of the massive, Islamic invasion happening across Europe.

(PHOTO: Mariano Sayno / Getty Images)

Author image

About Sputnik

This article originally appeared at Sputnik.